An Garagiola | Editor

 

Jenny Case (left) and Sam Stahlman (right) talk about how girls Rock. Photo taken by  R. Michael Aguirre
Jenny Case (left) and Sam Stahlman (right) talk about how girls Rock. Photo taken by
R. Michael Aguirre

On Tuesday Feb. 10, Century College’s Gender Studies Department sponsored Jenny Case and She Rock She Rock.

Case is the founder of She Rock She Rock, a non-profit organization that was created to house Girls Rock and Roll Retreats.

Girls Rock is a day camp program for girls ages 8-16. At the retreats she teaches young women how to empower themselves through music.

During her presentation in The Nest, she mentioned reading Rolling Stone’s “100 Greatest Drummers of all Time.” There were zero women listed. There were only two women on the best guitarist list. The point of her camps is to show girls they belong on that list, empowering them through music. Even those without prior musical knowledge are taught to play instruments, sing, and write their own songs, which they perform in front of hundreds of people at the end of the week. They sing original songs with lyrics like, “I’m not your sister’s Barbie, I’m made of skin, not plastic, isn’t that fantastic?” (Hot Kool-Aid)

A full Nest for Jenny Case. Photo taken by  R. Michael Aguirre
A full Nest for Jenny Case. Photo taken by
R. Michael Aguirre

Case teaches her campers to be unapologetic. Instead of, “I’m sorry,” campers say, “I rock,” when they make a mistake.

With Case was a former camper. Sam Stahlman from the band Cadence and the Wolf, a local band, told students how Case’s influence helped Cadence and the Wolf find success without having to sellout.

After forming a band at a Girls Rock and Roll Retreat, Cadence and the Wolf was offered a deal with a major record label.

 

 Jenny Case and Sam Stahlman of Cadence and the Wolf present a video made by campers at Girls Rock and Roll Retreat. Photo taken by  R. Michael Aguirre
Jenny Case and Sam Stahlman of Cadence and the Wolf present a video made by campers at Girls Rock and Roll Retreat. Photo taken by
R. Michael Aguirre

The label wanted the girls to give the girls a “sexy” image, by telling them how to dress and act, and also wanted to put stipulations on their music.

Instead, the ladies met up with a local agent and became successful musicians without a hyper-sexualized image.

This lesson in girl power is one Case said she saw reflected in many female bands in the 1990s, but not so much anymore. Through She Rock She Rock, Case says she hopes to, “Get it on the radar,” that girls can make great music.

She Rock She Rock is now accepting applications from female identified persons interested in volunteering. Men are encouraged to participate in non-mentorship, behind-the-scenes rolls.

Jenny Case, founder of She Rock She Rock. Photo taken by  R. Michael Aguirre
Jenny Case, founder of She Rock She Rock. Photo taken by
R. Michael Aguirre

She Rock She Rock also offers Ladies Rock camps because, “It’s not only girls that need this empowerment. Everyone needs this,” says Case.

In giving them an instrument and a microphone, Case is teaching girls that they don’t have to be sex objects to rock.

For more information on She Rock She Rock or their day camps, visit www.girlsrocknrollretreat.com.